water melons or oranges?

Are Water Melons Better than Oranges at half time in Hockey?

Its a given, a tradition and an inherent must-have of the hockey game that at half time a plate of cut oranges is bestowed to the team. Panting, limbs aching and with throats dry, the players make a bee-line to the over sized plate like circling hyenas. The hillock of fruity goodness is usually reduced to dry peel quicker than a small carcass reduced to bones by a circle of predators on the Serengeti.

To deprive players of this fundamental half time fare would cause growls and howls from all directions. There is a better offering that would calm and offer sustenance to the coalition of players; water melons slices are packed with more liquid and goodness that limber up limbs and refresh the parts other fruit can’t in super quick speed.

Glycemic index:

  • Cherries. GI score: 20. GL score: 6. …
  • Grapefruit. GI score: 25. GL score: 3. …
  • Dried apricots. GI score: 32. GL score: 9. …
  • Pears. GI score: 38. GL score: 4. …
  • Apples. GI score: 39. GL score: 5. …
  • Oranges. GI score: 40. GL score: 5. …
  • Plums. GI score: 40. GL score: 2 (GL score is 9 for prunes) …
  • Strawberries. GI score: 41. GL score: 3.
  • Water melon. GI of 72

Why are water melons better than oranges at half time?

The problem with oranges as a half time refresher is they have a low-glycemic level which means they release their carbohydrates slowly which means players may not even benefit from their carbohydrates in the second half. That said, feasting on oranges at half time is better than nothing. After all oranges possess vitamin B6 which breaks down carbohydrates into glucose for energy and help process fat and protein. On the other hand water melons have a higher glycemic level and are full of helpful goodness.

What does the water melon possess that makes it a better half time snack than oranges?

Each slice of watermelon has significant levels of vitamins A, B6 and C, lots of lycopene, antioxidants and amino acids. Water melon halves are 92% water so the players will feel refreshed which is 10% more than orange halves. In addition their juice is full of good electrolytes. These can even help prevent heat stroke.

Players whom eat water melon slices at half time or before the game will benefit by a reduction in muscle soreness and heart rate, according to a 2013 study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. These benefits can be attributed to watermelon’s amino acids, citrulline and arginine, which help improve circulation. More surprising is a report published by the Journal of Applied Physiology in 2015 which suggests that watermelon’s citrulline may also help improve athletic performance.

Would hockey players opt for a mound of melons?

In my opinion, yes. melons are delicious – as tasty as oranges. The benefits they possess are delivered much quicker, giving players energy for the second half and will replenish thirst like an oasis on the savannah. Once the information of better sustenance is known, there may just be a change in feeding habits among the steaming, hot and thirsty feeders.

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